All About Vitamins

Vitamin B12 (Cyanocobalamin)
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Why vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) is good for you

Vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) helps to make healthy red blood cells. If not enough cyanocobalamin foods are consumed, not enough red blood cells can be made and the ones that are created are too large and fragile to function properly. When there are not enough healthy red blood cells to carry oxygen and nutrients around the body, anaemia develops.

All the cells in the body need cyanocobalamin to grow and divide properly. Vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) is required to make all the different cells in the immune system, including white blood cells.

Vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) is the only B vitamin the body actually stores, mostly in the liver. The body absorbs vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) through digestive enzymes in the stomach, then binding with a substance called intrinsic factor after which it goes to the small intestine to be absorbed.

Vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) has another important role - to make the protective fatty layer, or sheath, that lines nerve cells – like insulation on electric wires, called the myelin sheath. If the nerve sheath is damaged and there is a lack of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin), mental function can be adversely affected.

 

Important vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) facts

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Groups at risk of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) deficiency

Generally, most people under 50 get enough vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) from their diet, but older adults and some other groups are at risk for deficiency:

Talk to a medical professional about vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) supplements BEFORE taking them.

 

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Symptoms of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) deficiency

The most obvious symptom of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) deficiency is anaemia – from a lack of healthy red blood cells. Anaemia caused by a shortage of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) in the diet is called megaloblastic anaemia; when it comes from a lack of intrinsic factor (a special substance in the stomach to help absorb vitamin B12), it is called pernicious anaemia. The causes are different, but the result are the same - there are not enough red blood cells and the ones that are there, are too big and fragile to survive long.

Early symptoms of Vitamin B12 Deficiency

These symptoms can develop slowly and even when blood tests show that vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) levels are “normal”. In the elderly, the above symptoms can be mistaken for senility.

The damage from vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) deficiency could be permanent if it is not fixed quickly.

 

Vitamin B12 (Cyanocobalamin) and health

Talk to a medical professional about vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) supplements BEFORE taking them.

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Vitamin B12 (Cyanocobalamin) in food

FOOD AMOUNT
Vitamin B12 (mcg)
Clams, steamed
85g
84.06
Beef, liver
85g
68.00
Chicken, liver
85g
16.6
Pate de foie gras
85g
2.66
Tuna, canned, light, in water
230g
2.66
Liverwurst
1 slice
2.42
Flounder
85g
2.13
Beef, mince
85g
2.10
Cottage cheese, low fat
1 cup
1.43
Yoghurt, low fat
1 cup
1.28
Milk, low fat
1 cup
0.90
Egg
1 large
0.56
Cheese, Swiss
28g
0.48
Chicken, drumstick
1 medium
0.35
Cheese, Cheddar
28g
x0.23xx

 

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Vitamin B12 (Cyanocobalamin) recommended daily intake (RDI)

RDA lifestage age amount
  INFANTS 0-6mths
7-12mths
0.4mcg
0.5mcg
  CHILDREN 1-3yrs
4-8yrs
0.9mcg
1.2mcg
  CHILDREN 9-13yrs
14-18yrs
1.8mcg
2.4mcg
  ADULTS 19-50yrs 2.4mcg
  SENIORS 51+yrs
2.4mcg
  PREGNANT   2.6mcg
  LACTATING   2.8mcg
 
TOLERABLE UPPER LIMIT
None established
 
TOXIC LEVELS Essentially non-toxic


The tolerable upper limits should only be taken for short periods and only under medical supervision.

 

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Vitamin B12 (Cyanocobalamin) works best with

 

Overdosage, toxicity and cautions for vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin)

Vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) has very low toxicity in normal, otherwise healthy adults. It is virtually impossible to overdose on vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) as any excess is normally excreted in the urine.

CAUTIONS

Large doses of vitamin C can destroy vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) – take these supplements at least an hour apart, not at the same time.


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references

 

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Last reviewed: 1 January 2009 || Last updated: 1 January 2009

 

NOTE: Mega doses of vitamins, minerals, amino acids, or other supplements cannot cure illnesses and in fact can be very dangerous and produce toxic side effects and interfere with medicine you are taking. Always ensure you consult your doctor before taking any type of nutrient supplement.
Disclaimer: This guide is not intended to be used for diagnostic or prescriptive purposes. For any treatment or diagnosis of illness, please see your doctor.

 

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