All About Vitamins

Vitamin B1 (Thiamin)
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Why vitamin B1 (thiamin) is good for you

Vitamin B1 (thiamine) is involved in the production of glucose (or energy) for the brain and nervous system, to ensure they are working effectively. Without enough energy to the brain and nervous system, a person can become forgetful, depressed, tired and apathetic.

Vitamin B1 (thiamine) also helps to keep the heart beating strongly and healthily, because it keeps the heart muscle elastic.

 

Important vitamin B1 (thiamin) facts

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Groups at risk of vitamin B1(thiamin) deficiency

Talk to a medical professional about vitamin B1 (thiamin) supplements BEFORE taking them.

 

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Symptoms of vitamin B1 (thiamin) deficiency

Vitamin B1 (thiamin) deficiency is very rare as it is so easily found in the typical diet of most people, that very few people are seriously deficient, but deficiency still occurs in the less developed countries.

Severe vitamin B1 (thiamin) deficiency after only ten days without adequate intake through the diet (or supplements) causes the disease Beri Beri.


Beri beri is identified with the following deficiency symptoms:

Sometimes Beriberi causes the heart to enlarge, which is very serious and can be life-threatening.

Vitamin B1 (thiamin) deficiency, caused by alcoholism, eventually causes a type of nerve damage called Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

 

Vitamin B1 (thiamin) and health

Talk to a medical professional about vitamin B1 (thiamin) supplements BEFORE taking them.

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Vitamin B1 (thiamin) in food

FOOD AMOUNT
Vitamin B1 (mg)
Sunflower seeds
85g
1.95
Ham
85g
0.82
Wheatgerm
¼ cup
0.55
Pork, roasted
85g
0.52
Peanuts
85g
0.36
Pecans
85g
0.27
Oatmeal
1 cup
0.26
Beef, liver
85g
0.23
Potato
1 medium
0.22
Bagel
1 medium
0.21
Beans, black
½ cup
0.21
Peas, green
½ cup
0.21
Raisins
½ cup
0.21
Rice, brown
1 cup
0.20
Cashews
85g
0.18
Corn
½ cup
0.18
Beans, kidney
½ cup
0.14
Orange
1 medium
0.13
Asparagus, steamed
1 cup
0.12
Bread, whole wheat
1 slice
0.09
Milk, non-fat
1 cup
0.09
Chicken, roasted
85g
0.06
Beef, lean
85g
0.05

 

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Vitamin B1 (thiamin) recommended daily intake (RDI)

RDA lifestage age Amount
  INFANTS 0-6mths
7-12mths
0.2mg
0.3mg
  CHILDREN 1-3yrs
4-8yrs
0.5mg
0.6mg
  CHILDREN 9-13yrs
male: 14-18yrs
female: 14-18yrs
0.9mg
1.2mg
1.0mg
  ADULTS male: 19-50yrs
female: 19-50yrs
1.2mg
1.1mg
  SENIORS male: 51+yrs
female: 51+yrs
1.2mg
1.1mg
  PREGNANT   1.4mg
  LACTATING   1.4mg
 
TOLERABLE UPPER LIMIT
none established
 
TOXIC LEVELS >125mg/kg body weight


The tolerable upper limits should only be taken for short periods and only under medical supervision.

 

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Vitamin B1 (thiamin) works best with

 

Overdosage, toxicity and cautions for vitamin B1 (thiamin)

Vitamin B1 (thiamin) is a relative non-toxic vitamin, except at exceedingly high doses.

Side effects at the high doses (listed above) are:

CAUTION

Side effects of toxicity have also been noted at levels at 100 times higher than the recommended dietary allowances (ie at only 100mg doses) in some people.



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references

 

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Last reviewed: 1 January 2009 || Last updated: 1 January 2009

 

NOTE: Mega doses of vitamins, minerals, amino acids, or other supplements cannot cure illnesses and in fact can be very dangerous and produce toxic side effects and interfere with medicine you are taking. Always ensure you consult your doctor before taking any type of nutrient supplement.
Disclaimer: This guide is not intended to be used for diagnostic or prescriptive purposes. For any treatment or diagnosis of illness, please see your doctor.

 

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